Writing a Book: The 5 Myths and Truths

Do you want to write a book?

According to GhostwritingLLC statistics, one in 6 or 8 adults dreams of being a writer. Yet 99% of them will never reach their goal. Why?

Between lack of time, procrastination, inexperience… There are always excuses to abandon a project.

 

There is what you think you know about writing and real life. Some myths die hard.

Can you distinguish the true from the false? Let’s go…

1. Writing a book is reserved for an elite

Myth!

 

The image of the fanciful author, solitary with a glassy gaze and a thick beard, is no longer relevant. Today, Monsieur Tout-le-Monde also has the right to write and distribute his work to as many people as possible.

I am thinking in particular of Stephenie Meyer, whose Twilight series we owe, which has sold more than 100 million copies worldwide. OK, I won’t lie to you, I don’t think this is a masterpiece.

However, when you think that nothing predestined her to become a successful novelist, it’s not so bad for a housewife!

As a reminder, the lady wrote her first novel, in the space of three months, although she lacks writing experience.

What is preventing you from giving it a try too?

Nothing is impossible with motivation and persistence. And with the democratization of the Internet, it becomes even easier to make oneself known and collect constructive opinions.

 

2. To write a good book, you need to have a plan

Myth! Nay!

 

Many writers have never used plans or synopses.

This hasn’t stopped writers like Stefan Wul (Niourk), Stephen King (Carrie, Shining) or Michael Connelly (Credence of Blood) from writing masterpieces.

By the way, here is a short quote from Harry Bosch’s dad: “Working with a plan is like working with a boss, a boss who tells you what to do. And this boss, frankly, I’m doing very well. ”

In any case, I personally like to find in the writing this feeling of urgency, to be able to give free rein to my imagination, to follow the evolution of the characters, to follow my instinct.

It’s not Tolkien who wants! (The gentleman has developed a whole mythology and language in his fantasy novels, such as The Lord of the Rings.)

The writer’s tip: Use a special notebook and write down your interesting ideas. Divide it preferably into three parts, Story, Characters and anything that doesn’t fit, in others.

 

3. Simplicity, conciseness and honesty can be an explosive recipe

Truth!

 

Why seek complexity all the time? The simplest ideas are often the best.

You just have to look around you. Aren’t Disney or Pixar animated films the most touching and universal?

For example, the story of WALL-E fits on a post-it: the sentimental adventure of two little robots in a devastated world.

However, in the absence of dialogue, Andrew Stanton’s baby manages to make us feel a wide range of emotions.

 

The writer’s tip: Write about what you know best, what speaks to you the most. You will see that your book will be much better for it.

 

4. Editing your book is an obstacle course

Truth!

 

We might as well be clear: to get published, work and talent are no longer enough. In the publishing world, places are expensive.

Editors receive hundreds of manuscripts each month and have no time to waste. They are looking for the TRICK that will make the difference. Nothing else!

Getting edited is therefore difficult and rejection letters can quickly fall. The Patience and perseverance are therefore essential.

Writer’s Tip: Self-publishing is mostly a disguised scam. Beware of publishing houses that offer to cover all the costs associated with the publication of your book.

A credible publisher, such as Gallimard or Hachette, will never ask you to pay a single penny.

 

5. Writing a book is writing for yourself

Truth and myth!

 

Have you fallen into the trap? It really is a difficult question: “For whom and why do we write?”

People have taken it into their heads to write a bestseller, at all costs. I do not reason in this way. My ideal, as a writer, would be to imagine the novel that I would like to read.

 

In any case, what matters most is to have fun, while writing. Isn’t it easier like that?

I hope I have enlightened you more on writing and the writing profession, the common vision of which often remains distorted.

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